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Partners in Caring: Fall 2013

Fall 2013 Issue

 


I Was Deaf, and You Heard My Cries for Hel

 

‘I Was Deaf, and You Heard My Cries for Help’ My name is Chris. As a homeless teenager, I went from group home to group home. It never lasted long because no one could communicate with me or help with my problems. And I always ended up losing my temper.

When you have emotional issues, life is hard enough. But when you’re deaf and nobody around you knows sign language, it’s so much more difficult.

I felt stuck. It was so depressing. But all that began to change when I went to The Salvation Army. I was 22.

I could tell they really cared, but because they didn’t have an interpreter, there were communication problems. I still had outbursts, and sometimes they had to remove me from the building. I was out of control.

They Never Gave Up on Me

But The Salvation Army never gave up on me. They prayed about how to help me, and four of them took sign language classes. One began to mentor me, and helped with vocational training and finding a job. That man is like a father to me today.

I started gaining control over my anger, mostly because I had found the love and support I had so desperately needed. Now, at 24, I work as a volunteer with The Salvation Army, I have a part-time job, and I live in an apartment with other persons with disabilities.

If it weren’t for The Salvation Army — and your generous support — I would be on the streets, all alone. The Salvation Army is my family, and I will never forget what they have done for me. Thank you for making it possible!

 


They Could Have Their Cake and Eat It Too!

 

They Could Have Their Cake and Eat It Too!Old buddies Mark and Frank lived in the same assisted living complex, enjoying each other’s company in their later years. But when the facility was closed, they were moved into other local housing with government help. Social Security benefits, on which both men rely, stalled for a few months while the new addresses were being processed.

Mark and Frank had no way to pay the rent in the meantime, and they were very worried about what would happen next.

When The Salvation Army heard about their plight, they stepped in to help. They paid a part of the men’s rent so they could stay in their apartments without incurring additional fees. They gave household items. They provided enough food to stretch Mark and Frank’s limited food stamp budget.

They even provided a birthday cake, donated by a local bakery, on Frank’s big day; the men celebrated by sharing the cake with their new neighbors.

Mark and Frank are so appreciative of The Salvation Army’s help, and they both know that it couldn’t have happened without your compassion. Thank you very much!

 


What a Difference You’re Making!

 

What a Difference You’re Making!Your care and concern are improving the lives of so many people in our community, and they are very thankful.

With your help, the hungry have been fed, the homeless have been sheltered, the jobless have found work, the abused and abandoned have found hope.

In fact, thanks to caring friends like you, The Salvation Army USA was able to reach out across the country last year with:

 

 

  • 57.8 million meals for the hungry
  • 9.9 million nights of shelter
  • Basic social services for 17.8 million
  • 7.8 million cash grants & welfare orders
  • Visits to 2.4 million persons in institutions
  • Holiday assistance to 4.3 million
  • 21 million tangible items distributed
  • Counseling and spiritual direction for lost souls
  • Disaster relief services
  • And much more

Thank you for bringing hope to hurting souls!

 


Please Consider Volunteering Today

 

Please Consider Volunteering Today

Volunteers are our lifeblood, all year long. But during the holidays, The Salvation Army especially needs your help.

Whatever your background, gifts, skills, or availability, you can have an impact on those we serve. Please call 1-800-SAL-ARMY (1-800-725-2769) or visit our volunteer page today.